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Park Avenue Armory’s mission is to revitalize one of America’s historic treasures as a dynamic alternative arts space unlike any other in New York. Part palace, part industrial shed, the Armory is dedicated to the development and presentation of work in the visual and performing arts best realized in a non-traditional setting. With its Gilded Age interiors and soaring 55,000-square-foot Drill Hall, the Armory allows artists to create – and audiences to experience – epic, immersive and adventurous work that cannot be done anywhere else. The Armory seeks to stimulate the most ambitious and innovative work many artists will undertake in their career. Such has been its impact in its first five years that in December 2011 The New York Times noted “Park Avenue Armory…has arrived as the most important new cultural institution in New York City.”

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BIG ART 2012: The Armory’s Year in Review

NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC
Philharmonic 360
June 29 - 30, 2012

When we say big, we mean BIG. In June, three full orchestras filled the Armory’s 55,000 square-foot drill hall with sound, surrounding the audience with Karlheinz Stockhausen’s landmark piece, Gruppen. But the audience came prepared: more than one ticketholder showed up with musical scores in hand and took seats within arms-reach of Alan Gilbert, the New York Philharmonic’s Music Director. Also on the bill was Pierre Boulez’s Rituel in memoriam Bruno Maderna, Charles Ives’ The Unanswered Question, and the finale of Act I of Mozart’s Don Giovanni. As Alex Ross of the New Yorker put it in his review, “audiences hate modern classical music, except when they don’t.”

Photo: James Ewing

BIG ART 2012: The Armory’s Year in Review

NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC
Philharmonic 360
June 29 - 30, 2012

When we say big, we mean BIG. In June, three full orchestras filled the Armory’s 55,000 square-foot drill hall with sound, surrounding the audience with Karlheinz Stockhausen’s landmark piece, Gruppen. But the audience came prepared: more than one ticketholder showed up with musical scores in hand and took seats within arms-reach of Alan Gilbert, the New York Philharmonic’s Music Director. Also on the bill was Pierre Boulez’s Rituel in memoriam Bruno Maderna, Charles Ives’ The Unanswered Question, and the finale of Act I of Mozart’s Don Giovanni. As Alex Ross of the New Yorker put it in his review, “audiences hate modern classical music, except when they don’t.”

Photo: James Ewing

Tags 2012 year in review New York Philharmonic Philharmonic 360 music Stockhausen Mozart Charles Ives Park Avenue Armory Pierre Boulez