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Park Avenue Armory’s mission is to revitalize one of America’s historic treasures as a dynamic alternative arts space unlike any other in New York. Part palace, part industrial shed, the Armory is dedicated to the development and presentation of work in the visual and performing arts best realized in a non-traditional setting. With its Gilded Age interiors and soaring 55,000-square-foot Drill Hall, the Armory allows artists to create – and audiences to experience – epic, immersive and adventurous work that cannot be done anywhere else. The Armory seeks to stimulate the most ambitious and innovative work many artists will undertake in their career. Such has been its impact in its first five years that in December 2011 The New York Times noted “Park Avenue Armory…has arrived as the most important new cultural institution in New York City.”

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Member Tickets are now on sale for the remaining programs and lectures in our 2014 season, including our hugely-popular Malkin Lecture Series, Under Construction showings with Lauren Flanigan and the creative team behind Aging Magician, plus interactive art-making workshops and performances for young people as part of our family programming. Become a member today and purchase tickets before they go on sale to the general public on September 8!

Member Tickets are now on sale for the remaining programs and lectures in our 2014 season, including our hugely-popular Malkin Lecture Series, Under Construction showings with Lauren Flanigan and the creative team behind Aging Magician, plus interactive art-making workshops and performances for young people as part of our family programming. Become a member today and purchase tickets before they go on sale to the general public on September 8!

Posted on Thursday, September 4th 2014

Qual voluttà trascorrere from Verdi’s I Lombardi, sung by Samuel Ramey, Lauren Flanigan and Luciano Pavarotti.

Soprano Lauren Flanigan, made headlines during the Metropolitan Opera’s 1992-93 season by substituting for an ill Aprile Millo in Verdi’s I Lombardi with no stage rehearsal, opposite Luciano Pavarotti. She went on to repeat the performance six more times, one of which was televised.

Posted on Wednesday, September 3rd 2014

Reblogged from Der springt noch auf