About this site

Park Avenue Armory’s mission is to revitalize one of America’s historic treasures as a dynamic alternative arts space unlike any other in New York. Part palace, part industrial shed, the Armory is dedicated to the development and presentation of work in the visual and performing arts best realized in a non-traditional setting. With its Gilded Age interiors and soaring 55,000-square-foot Drill Hall, the Armory allows artists to create – and audiences to experience – epic, immersive and adventurous work that cannot be done anywhere else. The Armory seeks to stimulate the most ambitious and innovative work many artists will undertake in their career. Such has been its impact in its first five years that in December 2011 The New York Times noted “Park Avenue Armory…has arrived as the most important new cultural institution in New York City.”

Liked on Tumblr

More liked posts

The best part of walking up three giant flights of stairs? Being greeted by our Knickerbocker Greys in the middle! Climb the grand oak staircase to the second floor and you’ll find this dapper display. Founded in 1881, the Knickerbocker Grey Cadet Corps is the oldest after school activity in the US. Their uniform, similar to that of an English organization, consists of a gray jacket, stylish knickerbockers, and round cap, all trimmed with black braid. Cadets undergo a series of experiences that build confidence, improve self-esteem, develop character, and leadership. Over 4,500 New Yorkers have been members of the Knickerbocker Greys, some from its highest social ranks. Many prominent families enlisted their sons into the Greys, who at the time drilled two afternoons a week. Originally an all-male organization, the Greys became coed in 1986 and still meet today.

Read more about the Cadets in this New York Times article.

The best part of walking up three giant flights of stairs? Being greeted by our Knickerbocker Greys in the middle! Climb the grand oak staircase to the second floor and you’ll find this dapper display. Founded in 1881, the Knickerbocker Grey Cadet Corps is the oldest after school activity in the US. Their uniform, similar to that of an English organization, consists of a gray jacket, stylish knickerbockers, and round cap, all trimmed with black braid. Cadets undergo a series of experiences that build confidence, improve self-esteem, develop character, and leadership. Over 4,500 New Yorkers have been members of the Knickerbocker Greys, some from its highest social ranks. Many prominent families enlisted their sons into the Greys, who at the time drilled two afternoons a week. Originally an all-male organization, the Greys became coed in 1986 and still meet today.

Read more about the Cadets in this New York Times article.

Posted on Wednesday, August 20th 2014

Tonight Icelandic composer Anna Thorvaldsdottir will premiere two new pieces in a portrait concert of her work, as played by the International Contemporary Ensemble in our Board of Officers Room. Anna works with large sonic structures that reveal the presence of a variety of sustained sounds, reflecting her sense of imaginative listening to nature. For a taste of her work, here is “Dreaming,” a sprawling and atmospheric sonic landscape that won the Nordic Council Music Prize in 2012.

Posted on Tuesday, August 19th 2014

A Tale of Two Macbeths & The Astor Place Riots


A tale of two Macbeth’s leads to the Astor place riots; check out this great article from Hyperallergic about our involvement. On May 10, 1849, The Seventh Regiment Armory was called in as part of the militia to calm the Astor Place Riots. The riots actually began as a dispute between the English Shakespearean actor William Macready and the American actor Edwin Forrest, over who was better in competing New York productions of MACBETH. When the rioting got out of hand, General Charles Sandford assembled the state’s Seventh Regiment, along with mounted troops in Washington Square Park, to add to the policemen already outside the Astor Place Opera House (now the Starbucks across from The Cube in Astor Place). Click to read more!

Posted on Monday, August 18th 2014

Our Youth Corps #students hard at work on an audio walk they’re composing for Battery Park! Inspired by Peter Sellars’ radical restaging of St. Matthew Passion, they’re exploring the transformation of a space through audio. The students selected Battery Park as the location for this composition because of its rich history linked to immigration, war, and shared reflection mirroring the prevalent themes in St. Matthew Passion. The audio walk employs QR codes which, once scanned, activate uniquely composed and location aware pockets of sound for the listener. Sounds will include digitally composed music, live samples from the space, narration and samples from Bach in order to connect to themes that are present in both St. Matthew Passion and in the architecture, monuments, landscape and kinesthetic energy of Battery Park. Armed with only a uniquely designed map and an audio listening device, the listener can explore Battery City in any order or flow they would like, calling up musical tracks when in specific locations. We will be sure let to you know when the project is complete! #audio #AudioWalk #sound #composition #BatteryPark #youth #art #nyc

Posted on Friday, August 15th 2014

#ThrowBackThursday to the 1891 all male comedic spoof “asyoulikeit” as performed by our Ninth Company Dramatics Club. The Club was founded in 1884 and over the course of its 12 years, it held eight major productions – some even reviewed in The New York Times. The Club held castings and rehearsals in their room at the Armory and would perform in venues around the city such as the University Club Theatre, the Metropolitan Opera House and the Berkley Lyceum. These productions were always comedic spoofs of real plays. Notable productions were “Katherine” (based on Taming of the Shrew) of 1888 and “Asyoulikeit”. All parts were played by the men of the company and included song and dance. #TBT

#ThrowBackThursday to the 1891 all male comedic spoof “asyoulikeit” as performed by our Ninth Company Dramatics Club. The Club was founded in 1884 and over the course of its 12 years, it held eight major productions – some even reviewed in The New York Times. The Club held castings and rehearsals in their room at the Armory and would perform in venues around the city such as the University Club Theatre, the Metropolitan Opera House and the Berkley Lyceum. These productions were always comedic spoofs of real plays. Notable productions were “Katherine” (based on Taming of the Shrew) of 1888 and “Asyoulikeit”. All parts were played by the men of the company and included song and dance. #TBT

Posted on Thursday, August 14th 2014

"Life should be lived on the edge of life. You have to exercise rebellion: to refuse to tape yourself to rules, to refuse your own success, to refuse to repeat yourself, to see every day, every year, every idea as a true challenge - and then you are going to live your life on a tightrope." - Philippe Petit

A very happy birthday to the amazing high-wire artist! If you haven’t seen the documentary MAN ON WIRE about his 1974 WTC feat, we highly recommend it!

"Life should be lived on the edge of life. You have to exercise rebellion: to refuse to tape yourself to rules, to refuse your own success, to refuse to repeat yourself, to see every day, every year, every idea as a true challenge - and then you are going to live your life on a tightrope." - Philippe Petit

A very happy birthday to the amazing high-wire artist! If you haven’t seen the documentary MAN ON WIRE about his 1974 WTC feat, we highly recommend it!

Posted on Wednesday, August 13th 2014